VANITY FAIR

horizontal line
A Vroom of His Own

January 1st, 2011

With its stainless-steel counters, halogen lights, and museum-style installations, D.A.D. Garage looks nothing like an everyday, oil-stained garage. Of course not–it belongs to Ralph Lauren, who owns 60 or so of the rarest, most valuable cars in the world, including a 1938 Bugatti coupe, a 1938 Alfa Romeo Mille Miglia roadster, and the world’s only 1930 Mercedes-Benz SSK “Count Trossi” roadster, all in ideal condition and all driven by the designer himself. The author plugs into the lifelong fantasy behind Lauren’s collection.

The King of Central Park

September 2008

From the marble-columned lobby to the wine cellar and pool, the author examines the art, as well as the limits, of architect Robert A. M. Stern’s 15 Central Park West.

American Dreamer

September 2007

As Ralph Lauren enters decade five as a design superpower, the author explores his re-creation of a world that never was.

diller@gehry.nyc

June 2007

The author explores the partnership behind Gehry’s first freestanding structure in New York City.

The New Barnes Foundation Building: Soulful, Self-assured, and Soaked with Light

May 4th, 2012

There is no record of what Dr. Albert C. Barnes, the famously eccentric, famously difficult collector of post-Impressionist painting, African art, ancient art, and American furniture and decorative art said to the architect Paul Cret when he hired him to build the Barnes Foundation, his personal museum, in suburban Philadelphia in 1922. Cret gave Dr. […]

Reflected Grief

April 1st, 2012

Maya Lin’s Vietnam Veterans Memorial, with its extraordinary black granite wall extending gradually into the earth and carved with the names of 58,272 Americans who died in the nation’s tragic escapade in Southeast Asia, was finished 30 years ago. It is still far and away the greatest memorial of modern times—the most beautiful, the most […]

A Monumental Conflict

July 16th, 2012

Everyone agrees Dwight D. Eisenhower was one of America’s greatest leaders. But the effort to memorialize the 34th president—with a monument on four acres near the Capitol—has led to open conflict, pitting Eisenhower’s grandchildren against one of America’s most respected architects, Frank Gehry.

horizontal line